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Events on April 26, 2014
  • Field Trip to Gillam Park and Little Rock Audubon Center (LRAC)
    Starts:April 26, 2014 - 7:30 am
    Description: Meet at 7:30 a.m. at Gillam Park in the last parking lot past the swimming pool. Gillam has great habitat for migrating spring warblers. There will be moderate walking on fairly level but possibly muddy trails. Master Naturalists participating in their annual BioBlitz will join us. When we finish at Gillam, we’ll drive to the LRAC, where we’ll bird the new wildlife observation trail, then assist with light trail maintenance. Bring work gloves and wear sturdy walking shoes or boots that you don’t mind getting dirty. Last, we’ll head to Industrial Harbor Road and Terry Lock & Dam to look for Western Kingbirds, and Painted Buntings.

    Directions—Gillam Park is in southeast Little Rock near the airport. Address is 5300 Gillam Park Road, Little Rock. Take I-30 West heading south from Little Rock. Then exit onto I-440 going towards the airport. Take Springer Road Exit 1. At the bottom of the exit ramp, turn left onto Springer Road. Go approximately 1 mile to just past the LRAC. Turn right onto Gillam Park Road. Follow it to the end and into the park to the parking lot past the swimming pool.
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  • Our Next Event is on April 26, 2014
    Field Trip to Gillam Park and Little Rock Audubon Center (LRAC)
    Starts: 7:30 am
    Ends: April 26, 2014 - 1:00 pm
    Description: Meet at 7:30 a.m. at Gillam Park in the last parking lot past the swimming pool. Gillam has great habitat for migrating spring warblers. There will be moderate walking on fairly level but possibly muddy trails. Master Naturalists participating in their annual BioBlitz will join us. When we finish at Gillam, we’ll drive to the LRAC, where we’ll bird the new wildlife observation trail, then assist with light trail maintenance. Bring work gloves and wear sturdy walking shoes or boots that you don’t mind getting dirty. Last, we’ll head to Industrial Harbor Road and Terry Lock & Dam to look for Western Kingbirds, and Painted Buntings.

    Directions—Gillam Park is in southeast Little Rock near the airport. Address is 5300 Gillam Park Road, Little Rock. Take I-30 West heading south from Little Rock. Then exit onto I-440 going towards the airport. Take Springer Road Exit 1. At the bottom of the exit ramp, turn left onto Springer Road. Go approximately 1 mile to just past the LRAC. Turn right onto Gillam Park Road. Follow it to the end and into the park to the parking lot past the swimming pool.

Meet at 7:30 a.m. at Gillam Park in the last parking lot past the swimming pool.  Gillam has great habitat for migrating spring warblers.  There will be moderate walking on fairly level but possibly muddy trails.  Master Naturalists participating in their annual BioBlitz will join us.  When we finish at Gillam, we’ll drive to the LRAC, where we’ll bird the new wildlife observation trail, then assist with light trail maintenance.  Bring work gloves and wear sturdy walking shoes or boots that you don’t mind getting dirty.  Last, we’ll head to Industrial Harbor Road and Terry Lock & Dam to look for Western Kingbirds, and Painted Buntings.

Directions—Gillam Park is in southeast Little Rock near the airport.  Address is 5300 Gillam Park Road, Little Rock.  Take I-30 West heading south from Little Rock.  Then exit onto I-440 going towards the airport.  Take Springer Road Exit 1.  At the bottom of the exit ramp, turn left onto Springer Road.  Go approximately 1 mile to just past the LRAC.  Turn right onto Gillam Park Road.  Follow it to the end and into the park to the parking lot past the swimming pool.

Destination

March 29, 2014

Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge

Saturday, March 29 forty-three birders spent the morning at the Bald Knob National Wildlife Refuge and found a total of 48 species of birds.  The day started out chilly, cloudy, and windy then warmed-up quickly once the sun came out.  Our targets were lingering water birds and early arriving shorebirds.

A mix of several hundred Northern Shovelers, American Coots, Blue-winged and Green-winged Teal, plus a smattering of Mallards and Gadwalls comprised the lingering waterfowl group.  Of the many shorebirds we spotted, American Golden-Plovers were quite numerous.  We also had lots of Wilson’s Snipe, Pectoral Sandpipers, Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, a small group of Long-billed Dowitchers, a few Least Sandpipers, and of course the ubiquitous Killdeer.

Raptors included one adult and one juvenile Bald Eagle, an Osprey, Red-shouldered and Red-tailed Hawks, and several Northern Harriers.  The best bird of the day was a very cooperative Peregrine Falcon.  It was first spotted perched in a small bush, then it flew to the ground, where it stayed long enough for people to get good looks at it in their scopes.  Next, it took off and dive-bombed and harassed the Northern Harriers for several minutes, then made numerous passes over the fields, scattering shorebirds and ducks with every swoop.  A life bird for many in the group.

The area around the grain bins was awash in Brown-headed Cowbirds, Red-winged Blackbirds, and Common Grackles, and a couple of Eastern Meadowlarks and House Sparrows.  At the Night-Heron swamp, FOS Purple Martins and Tree Swallows made their appearance, plus a Belted Kingfisher, but no Night-Herons.  We spent the last of the morning sorting through the sparrows and tallied Field, Vesper, Savannah, Song, White-throated, and Swamp.  Two American Pipits and a few American Goldfinches were seen and heard.  A good time was had by all!

Submitted by

Karen Holliday

Snakes of Arkansas

Speaker: Jeremy Chamberlain

Over 38 species of snake reside in the state. Come learn about their diverse ecology, ways to distinguish confusing species, and where they occur. There will be a slideshow along with live and preserved specimens. Also, there will be information on current research and conservation efforts for these interesting animals, done right here in Arkansas.

Jeremy Chamberlain is a PhD candidate at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock, where he works in the herpetology lab of Dr. Matthew Gifford. He graduated with a B.S. in biology at Iowa State University in 2009. He got an M.S. in biology from the University of Texas at Tyler in 2011. His major research interests are the energetics of life-histories and the ecology of reptiles and amphibians. He plans on graduating in the spring of 2016.

Location: Fletcher Library.  Time: 7 PM.